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10 Acquired Tastes


Coffee smells great, but its bitter taste is an obstacle for many people at first.
Coffee smells great, but its bitter taste is an obstacle for many people at first.
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There's one in every crowd -- a person with a penchant for eating something that completely grosses everyone else out. Perhaps it's your co-worker who sits at the break room lunch table, blithely scarfing down liver and onions while the rest of the group gags in his direction. He simply raises an eyebrow and remarks, "It's an acquired taste."

When you acquire a taste for something, it means you've learned to ignore the food's perceived negative qualities in order to enjoy its benefits. Maybe you've learned to ignore the texture. Or perhaps you're blocking out its smell. You may even be able to stand a not-so-tasty taste, if it gets you something you need or want. For example, coffee tastes bitter, but for many people, the caffeine fix it provides outweighs its bitter flavor.

Or, perhaps you learn to like something because you've heard it's good for you (ugh, spinach). And sometimes you learn to like something out of necessity. If all you can afford to eat are Ramen noodles, then you'll learn to like Ramen noodles.

We've been thinking: What are some of the most common acquired tastes? Read on to see if you've acquired the ones on our list.


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