Food and Recipes

Here is a place for you to play with your food -- literally: enjoy, have fun with and celebrate food -- but don't worry, we'll still help you get dinner on the table every night.


We all know a healthy diet is the key to good health. One diet buster is red meat, which is full of fat. But what about grass-fed beef? Is it better?

They take leftovers from frigid to sizzling in minutes. But is the microwave oven too good to be true? Some say it takes more than the flavor out of your food.

Unlike more commonly known taste aspects like bitter or sweet, umami is tough to pin down. But the savory sensation gives rich dishes undeniable oomph. Learn what gives a food its umami nature and how our tongues taste it.

When the sweet stuff is mixed with water, it suddenly wants to bond with everything it encounters. Why so clingy, sugar?

What's that bagged mass in your freezer — and did you really want to eat 12 chicken breasts right now? Here's how to freeze food in serving-size portions.

The same compounds responsible for ginger's potent taste and smell offer relief to gurgling digestive systems.

The practice has ancient roots — but GMOs as we know them really started taking off after some key discoveries about DNA.

See your friends rolling their eyes when you tell them you've gone gluten-free? Find out why the gluten-free diet craze is meeting resistance from the masses.

To a food lover, the idea of trading pizza for a pill isn't exactly appetizing. But in a world where many of us struggle with getting daily nourishment, being a foodie is a luxury. Is a cure for world hunger on the horizon?

These healthy grains can bring new flavors to your plate while providing healthy, whole grain goodness.

If peanuts are technically not nuts, what are they?

When you see the increasingly popular label on food products, does that mean you're getting a sugar-free product?

One "synbio" ingredient — with its computer-generated DNA — got the OK to bear a "natural" label. Could these science-lab concoctions be considered organic, too?

"All-natural" labeling offers a thin slice of reassurance to sandwich lovers who want to avoid nitrites and nitrates. But would deli meat be deli meat without them?

Sure you can freeze eggs — actually you can freeze any food. It's the thawing part that can be tricky. How can a little prep time now prevent a freezer eggsplosion later?

Spoiler alert: Light and heat — not your milk's fat content — are what get bacteria excited.

Wheat takes the heat for gut problems, painful joints — even cancer. Has human intervention transformed modern crops into harmful fake food?

Most of us eat breakfast, lunch and dinner every day without stopping to think about it. So why do we eat three meals a day — is there a biological reason, or is it a societal construct?

Your food might look perfectly fine on the plate, but silent ingredients — packaging chemicals — probably have seeped into it during storage. How do these substances affect your food?

Salt has kept entire civilizations alive thanks to its ability to prevent foods from turning into bacteria-laden killers. It preserves food, too. What is it about salt that makes it so versatile?

Whether you're about to munch on some sodium-laden cured meats or a salty snack, go ahead and grab a big glass of water. Why does salt make you so thirsty?

Kale has become the little black dress of the culinary world: chic, understated and perfect for nearly every occasion. But it comes with a not-so-elegant side effect. We'll — ahem — get to the bottom of why kale makes you so gassy.

Meals would be pretty boring without the benefit of herbs and spices. But lest you think those are interchangeable terms, we're here to tell you they're definitely not. What's the difference between herbs and spices?

Discerning between a fruit and a vegetable may seem simple: Fruits have seeds and vegetables don't. This works great if you're a botanist, but not so well if you're not. We'll finally tell you which category tomatoes fall into (or maybe we won't).

Sometimes it seems as if processed meats (like the pastrami on your late-night sandwich) don't last long. But all those preservatives do serve a purpose — you'll be able to eat that pastrami days after your home-cooked chicken has gone bye-bye.