Beverage Facts

The Beverages section deals with how all sorts of drinks actually work. Learn the affects that tea, beer, water and other beverages can have on your metabolism and overall health.


Are you a tea drinker that finds yourself growing tired of the same flavor? Well, you're in luck. Tea is now available in many different flavors, warm or cold, for refreshment or to improve health. Get answers to all of your tea questions here.

Coffee is a great pick-me-up, but how much do you really know about it? Find coffee questions and answers, including how to add flavor to your favorite brew and the best way to store coffee. Learn more here.

These days, soda pop is more than just cola and lemon-lime. See our list of 17 obscure brands of soda pop, including Pickle Juice "Sport" and DraCola.

As it turns out, beer is not the only factor in the 'beer goggles' effect. And scientists have come up with a fancy formula to prove it -- and let you calculate just how far off you are.

The main differences between espresso coffee and drip coffee are the fineness of the grind and the brewing time. Read this article to learn about the differences between drip and espresso coffee.

Ever wondered why people tap on soda cans before opening them? They do this to avoid a soda can explosion, but does it really help or is it a myth?

How do beermakers know how much alcohol is in the beer? And what is the difference between percent alcohol by volume and by weight?

I love decaffeinated coffee, but I've always wondered how they get the caffeine out of a coffee bean. How are coffee, tea and colas decaffeinated?

When I open a can of Guinness or some of the other upscale beers from Europe, I notice that a plastic ball shaped widget inside the tin releases gas to aerate the beer. How does this work?

You know soda pop isn't the greatest drink to consume, but do you know how much sugar they really put in soft drinks? Find out the answer here.

What exactly is root beer? Check out this article to learn all about root beer, how it's made, and why it's called "beer" in the first place.

People often store water for emergencies, but you might be surprised to find out that water can go bad just like fresh food. How can you store it safely?

You see these commercials like "Got Milk?" and "Milk -- it does a body good," and when I was a kid my mother made me drink a quart of milk a day, and doctors recommend that kids drink lots of milk at school, etc.