Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

5 Red Wine Nutrition Facts


4
A Lot of Red Wine Is Definitely Bad for You
Resist the urge to just keep pouring: A single serving of wine should be only one-fifth of a bottle.
Resist the urge to just keep pouring: A single serving of wine should be only one-fifth of a bottle.
Maren Caruso/Photodisc/Getty Images

Red wine is not a case of "if a little is good, a lot is better." Health problems caused by drinking more than two glasses daily outweigh any possible benefits. In fact, it can bring about the same illnesses that partaking moderately may combat.

Consider heart disease. Heavy drinking can promote conditions that trigger heart attack and stroke, like blood clots and atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat), while decreasing your chance of surviving an attack. It can lead to life-threatening cardiomyopathy (weak heart) and ventricular fibrillation (erratic heart twitching). It can also aggravate contributing factors like obesity and your level of triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood).

Likewise with cancer. The body breaks down alcohol into several known carcinogens, including acetaldehyde. This compound can damage the organs involved in its metabolism: the brain, pancreas, intestine and especially the liver.

Overindulgence has additionally been linked to anemia, dementia and suppression of the immune system, allowing infections to take hold. And it doesn't take a scientific study to show that people make some unhealthy choices after three or four drinks, like choosing to drive home -- or to have yet another drink.

Our next fact looks at how the risk of fungal attack affects the healthfulness of red wine. Surprisingly, it's a good thing.


More to Explore