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Ultimate Guide to the Jura Wine Region

Famous Wines of Jura


The Jura region is most famous for its Vin Jaune, a white wine made from very ripe Savagnin grapes. Once harvested, the traditional forms of fermentation are implemented before being transferred to burgundy barrels and placed in a cave, attic, cellar or any location that will allow for ample ventilation and fluctuations in temperature. The barrels will remain in the designated locale for at least six years, during which time they are regularly monitored for taste and acidity. Most barrels intended to produce the notorious Vin Jaune don't make the cut, and are instead used in a blend to produce a chardonnay or are sold as a Savagnin white wine. The perfect Vin Jaune is said to have hints of ginger, walnuts and honey, with occasional notes of curry [source: Lorch].

The chardonnay of the Jura region is also said to have a uniquely "nutty" taste. Chardonnay is the most popular wine grape in the region. It can be used to produce a white wine or a sparking Crémant. The chardonnay white wines of the Jura region are often stored in oak barrels after fermentation and, consequently, carry strong oak notes the longer they remain in the bottles. Some of the more creative producers in the region experiment with different barrels and aging techniques, but often release their wines at a young age when they still hold the mineral-like taste of the soils in which they grew [source: Lorch].

Finally, red wines produced from Poulsard and Trousseau grapes are also prevalent in the Jura region. These wines are usually served at dinner and pair well with the tastes of the region's cheese and sausages.

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