Fresh Ideas for Dinner

Are you stuck in a rut, eating the same dinners week after week? Peruse a variety of creative recipes to get some fresh new ideas for dinner.


Versatile, mild, affordable, healthy and utterly available, chicken is something of a standby in modern cooking. It's also quick to cook, especially if you follow one of these five cooking methods.

Kids are known for their picky ways at the dinner table, but with a little bit of ingenuity, you can have them eating their veggies and protein in no time.

Frozen food can be an asset to anyone who doesn't have time to cook an entire meal. So why not freeze some dinners to reheat at a later date?

Meatballs aren't just for spaghetti anymore! Learn how you can use these savory morsels to create tasty, innovative meals for your family.

Long known and loved as "the other white meat," pork is every bit as versatile as chicken. Pork chops, in particular, are delicious, healthy and easy to prepare in any number of ways. So what's the fastest way to take them from fridge to plate?

Bacon, eggs and apple-butter-slathered toast are an unexpected delight when served around 6 p.m. But breakfast for dinner has more than just novelty going for it. Why do lots of families turn tradition on its head come mealtime?

It's hard to imagine the American diet without tomatoes. But there are so many different varieties, and it can be hard to tell what kind to use for certain dishes.

Salt is a cheater's way out: Whether you're making a gourmet feast or whipping up scrambled eggs, it's easy to let salt carry the bulk of the flavor load for your dish. So how can we create flavorful meals without relying on salt?

Sea salt is coarser than regular table salt, and foodies rave about the great flavor. In terms of health benefits, though, is sea salt actually better for you?

Low-sodium salt may sound like the stuff of nonsense, but you'll find it on your grocery aisle shelves next to regular, old table salt. Anything that's low-sodium is better for you, right? Read this before you stock up on low-sodium salt.

Next time you're at your local grocer, cruise down the canned vegetable aisle and take a look at how many ways they've come up with to can a tomato. Diced, stewed, whole, sauced. But can one substitute for the other? After all, they're all tomatoes, right?

You know to drink at least eight glasses of water per day and to resist daily cupcakes. But how much sodium can your body handle -- and where are staggering sodium counts lurking?

Does it really matter if your carrots are boiled, steamed or roasted? Actually, it does. But that's the only simple part of the equation. Why would cooking vegetables make them less healthy?

The great tomato storage debate seems to be settled by the label on that little package of Romas warning: "Never Refrigerate." Pretty straightforward. Still, many people do just that and claim no ill effects. So, is the warning valid?

Tomato seeds are teeny-tiny, but they hold a lot of potential. If you extract them and dry them properly, you can create your very own heirloom tomatoes.

Tomato puree can serve as a base or add flavor to lots of dishes. What's more, it's quick and easy to prepare. Here's how to add it to your cooking repertoire.

Pelting unlucky victims with rotten produce is one of our oldest forms of expression. So, where did it start and why?

Tomatoes in season are some of the most delicious foods on Earth. There are still lots of ways to enjoy their flavor in the off season. You can even try them in place of some common ingredients. Here are five great examples.

We only need between 1,500 and 2,300 mg of sodium -- about one teaspoon of salt -- at most each day. But try as we might, it's hard to hit that goal, because some foods that we frequently eat have a lot more sodium than we realize. What are they?

Not all pickles are cucumbers. You can turn your unripe garden tomatoes into sweet or sour pickled delights. But how?

Unlike regular tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes are available all year. Don't just leave them soaking in the rays for too long -- we've got some irresistible recipes in which sun-dried tomatoes are the stars.

You chose a salad for lunch, so you're feeling pretty angelic right now. Healthy greens, vitamin-packed tomatoes and calcium-rich cheese won't tarnish your halo. But your salad dressing might. Did you just pour 400 milligrams of sodium on your lunch?

Slow cookers are a huge help for busy chefs, but it's easy to load your meals up with too much sodium. Have no fear, though -- with a few substitutions and the right ingredients, you can make your slow-cooked meal healthy and delicious.

Whether you're eating out or cooking at home, it's tough to eat healthy in America today. And because we like convenience, many of the foods we love have surprisingly high sodium contents. So what's a person to do? Is anything good for you anymore?

Although things like canned foods make cooking a little easier, there's a downside to them, too -- way too much sodium, which can be bad for your health. But with some clever substitutions and careful shopping, you can spice things up and cut back on the sodium.