The nougat in that candy bar is made from more shelf-stable ingredients.

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All-natural and Completely Unstable

The taste of homemade nougat may be easy to manipulate, but you better hurry up and eat it: This confection isn't built to last! Like most dishes made from all-natural ingredients, nougat tends spoil quickly -- particularly the lighter-colored variety. Even if your sugary treat doesn't go bad, the ingredients won't stay blended indefinitely. So it's not surprising that the nougat in mass-produced candy bars bears little resemblance to its homemade, all-natural counterpart.

Snickers bars are billed as containing nougat, but you're not going to find it in the ingredients list (as you will milk chocolate). Instead, you have to search through the list of 19 ingredients to find nougat-related elements. Sugar, corn syrup and nuts are all there, as are egg whites, though they're second to last on the list. What does this mean? You're getting significantly more soy lecithin, artificial flavoring and partially hydrogenated soybean oil than nougat.

Some candy bar wrappers specify what type of nougat you'll find inside, though white or brown is rarely noted. Regular Milky Way bars, for example, use malt-flavored nougat, while Milky Way Midnight's nougat is vanilla-flavored. Baby Ruth bars, on the other hand, contain thick, chocolaty nougat, but the manufacturers don't give away the particular flavor.

All these varying tastes, textures and brands make nougat extremely hard to classify. There's a definite similarity between the taste of homemade, all-natural nougat and what you'll find inside a candy bar, but it's difficult to describe. The natural stuff is fuller and more flavorful, and many people find nougat-infused candy bars lacking if they've ever had the real thing, but it's really all just a matter of, well, taste.