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Nutrition Content Questions


Calculating Nutrition in Homemade Foods
Although homemade foods do not come with a nutritional label, there are several ways to calculate their nutrition.
Although homemade foods do not come with a nutritional label, there are several ways to calculate their nutrition.
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Q. How do I figure out the carbohydrates in home­made bread? I make it from scratch or use my bread machine. My favorites are oatmeal or other whole grains.

A. Short of having your own computer and a nutritional analysis program, there are a couple of ways you can check the carbohydrate count on your homemade bread.

One way is to find a similar bread in the supermarket. Look for ingredients that are closest to the ones in your homemade bread. Then read the nutrition label. If your loaf is of a similar size and has similar ingredients, you'll have a ballpark figure for the carbohydrate count. Remember: Your homemade bread slices will need to be the same size as the store-bought slices.

You can also look up bread in carbohydrate-counting books. Most books offer a variety of different breads. These books usually are available at your local library, or they can be purchased at bookstores or online.

The surest way to know the carbohydrate count of your bread is to work with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator. Chances are that he or she has a nutritional analysis program. By entering your recipe ingredients and amounts, and the number of slices per loaf, you will be able to determine the carbohydrate count per slice. Your registered dietitian can then help you decide just how many slices of that bread should be in your individualized meal plan.

In the meantime, we've checked a carbohydrate-counting book for you. A slice of oatmeal bread has 13 grams of carb for 1 starch exchange, while a multi-grain slice has 12 carbs for 1 starch exchange. These are, of course, just estimates.

For more information on nutrition and food labeling, see:


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