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Nutrition Content Questions


Understanding Food Labels
The typical food label has a number of abbreviations and terms that may be unfamiliar to you.
The typical food label has a number of abbreviations and terms that may be unfamiliar to you.
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Q. I'm confused when I read nutrition labels. What do "mg" and "g" mean? Are these in food? Any help would be appreciated.

A. Milligrams (mg) and grams (g) are not in food. They are units of measurement used in the metric system.

Food is composed of protein, carbohydrate (starch), fat, sodium, fiber, and other components, such as vitamins and minerals. Nutritionists analyze food to determine how much of each component is contained in a serving.

On U.S. food labels and in nutritional information included with recipes, protein, carbohy­drate, fat, and fiber are mea­sured in grams by weight, abbreviated as "g." Choles­terol and sodium (salt) are measured in milligrams, abbre­vi­ated as "mg."

One gram equals .035 of an ounce; 100 grams equals 3.5 ounces; 1,000 milligrams equals 1 gram.

For more information on nutrition and food labeling, see:


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