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10 Sandwich Nutrition Facts

What sort of sandwich trivia do you know?
What sort of sandwich trivia do you know?
Planet Green

Sandwiches vary from simple to intricate; healthy to downright artery-clogging. Classics such as peanut butter and jelly, grilled cheese, and BLT tend fall in the range of medium-healthy, but variety is the spice of life – and sometimes "spice" translates to "less-than-healthy". And to say that some chefs and restaurant chains have taken sandwiches into the realm of the wacky would be a true understatement.

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A few years ago, Kentucky Fried Chicken released the Double Down Sandwich, a bacon-and-cheese concoction that replaces bread with, well, two fried chicken patties. The handheld fat-and-grease lovefest clocked in at 540 calories—remarkably low, actually, when you consider that the Double Down had 1380mg of sodium. The sandwich was available nationwide, caused an outcry from nutritionists (obviously), and launched just a few months ago in Japan under the euphemistic name “Chicken Fillet Double.”

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Eileen’s Bakery & Cafe, a real locals’ haunt in Fredericksburg, Va., offers a rather strange iteration of a classic curried chicken sandwich. Yes, there’s curried chicken salad and lettuce, but this version also includes peanut butter, creole mayonnaise, and pickles. Not convinced? According to the restaurant, it’s a customer favorite – jury's out on how your G.I. tract might feel about it.

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File this under: nutritious for the sight-impaired: This year the UK-based chain Wimpy introduced “braille hamburgers” in their South African stores. Yep, that’s right: each bun had sesame seeds specially arranged to form words in braille. An expression might read, “100% pure beef burger made for you.” The whole thing was a stunt, of course.

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When it opened in 2010, Brooklyn restaurant St. Anselm offered foodie bar food, including a most curious sandwich called the Newark Double. In it were two hot dogs, pizza bread, onion rings, crispy peppers, and fries, all deep-fried into submission. The sandwich was named after a North Jersey delicacy, but that didn’t fly in New York: St. Anselm closed, got its act together, and eventually reopened as a more sophisticated bistro.

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Combining two of America’s all-time favorite foods for some completely unknown reason, last summer Denny’s introduced a “Mac ‘n Cheese Big Daddy Patty Melt,” a 1,690-calorie sandwich consisting of mac ‘n’ cheese, melted cheddar, and the chain’s famous Frisco sauce, all piled on potato bread. The sandwich was available with “extra ooze” for an extra 69 cents.

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We generally think of sandwiches as wrapped in tin foil or wax paper, but earlier this year one company decided to change all that. Last May, the world saw the launch of The Candwich, a sandwich in a can. The product cost $12 for a four-pack and was geared toward “people on the go such as students, construction works, soccer moms and outdoor enthusiasts.” No refrigeration required, apparently.

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Someone at Burger King really got creative last November: the mega-chain’s Japan stores began serving a hamburger that measured more than 8.5 inches wide. The Pizza-Sized Burger was available in Fresh Avocado and Cheese Nacho flavors, and was promoted as a holiday treat, available with drinks and sides for four people.

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When Star Wars Episode I 3D was released in France in early 2012, French/Belgian fast-food chain Quick honored the occasion with a Darth Vader Burger, which, thanks to some aggressive food dye, was basically a double-cheeseburger on a pitch-black bun. Sadly, this treat was only available for a month, and only in France and Belgium.

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For a limited time, New York City sandwich shop and pizzeria Cer Te offered the “Mr. Potatoskin” sandwich: a BBQ-sauce-smothered chicken cutlet sandwiched between two potato skins that had been baked with salt and vinegar, then topped with cheddar and bacon and served with sour cream and chives on the side. In other words, someone decided to turn a classic baked potato into an actual sandwich. Points for creativity!

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Last but not least, here’s wacky sandwich from the Wisconsin State Fair: the Krispy Kreme Cheeseburger, which substitutes Krispy Kreme doughnuts for bread. One person interviewed estimated that 5,000 to 10,000 Krispy Kreme Cheeseburgers would sell at the fair. They only had 500 calories—not bad, given what’s in them—and cost $5 each.

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