Foraging for Food

If setting up the fire and cooking gear sounds like too grueling of a task at the end of a long day of hiking, or if something unfortunate were to happen to your food or cooking supplies, you could always try foraging for a meal. If the season is right, many wild berries, mushrooms and vegetables are ripe and ready to eat. Be very careful though, as some species of mushrooms and wild berries are poisonous [source: Martin-Buhler].­

Campfire Cooking Equipment

The most important things you'll need for campfire cooking are planning and patience. Utensils, pots, pans and modern camper-friendly kitchen supplies will not cook your meals for you. And, as avid campers know, something unexpected can always happen, so it's best to be prepared with a plan. Be sure to plan all of your meals ahead of time and ensure that ingredients can be kept cool if necessary. Measuring and separating ingredients, or cooking them so that they can simply be reheated, before you leave on your trip can be a big help [source: Love the Outdoors].

The most popular campfire cooking tool is the Dutch oven. The large, thick pot and lid are primarily used hanging from a tripod over the fire. However, you can also use a Dutch oven on a grill set up over the campfire or as a large serving bowl if you're camping with a group.

Most of the cooking equipment you'll nee­d can be found in the average kitchen, but make sure your kitchen supplies are durable enough to brave the great outdoors before you decide to bring them along. For instance, the wooden spoon you use at home is not a good idea for cooking over an open fire. Similarly, cast iron pots and pans are much better suited for the rigors of cooking in a fire pit. Although they may be bulkier and heavier to transport, the longer your cooking utensils are, the further your hands will be from the fire [source: Chuckwagon Diner].

Click to the last page to gain knowledge on some of the techniques you'll need to master before you begin your first campfire cooking experience.