Wine

Wine dates back many, many centuries and is a complex and historic drink. Wine comes in many different forms and every different type of wine has its own flavor, color and texture. Learn all about the complexity of wine on TLC Cooking.

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Auckland is one of the most well known cities in New Zealand, but few realize just what an influence the region has on the country's wine industry.

By Elizabeth Abbess

The Bay of Plenty might not be the most well-known -- or productive -- wine region in New Zealand, but it fares well with its small but robust collection of wineries.

By Rosalind Jackson

Nestled against the southern slope of the Alps, the low, fertile spread of land known as the Canterbury region is an environmental jewel resting on New Zealand's South Island.

By Olivia Page

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Central Otago is relatively new to the winemaking industry in New Zealand, but being a novice hasn't stopped the region from becoming a top wine producer.

By Libby Little

Gisborne, the third largest winemaking region of New Zealand, has dubbed itself the Chardonnay capital of New Zealand.

By Richard Winter

The Emporda wine region is tucked into the very northeastern corner of Spain. If you love the surrealist artist Salvador Dali, you might have heard of it.

By Sarah Siddons

Spain has a rich history of crusaders, bullfights and ships filled with Spanish gold. But Spain is also home to one of the oldest and most well respected wine regions in the world: La Rioja.

By Libby Little

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The Navarra wine region is located in the Basque country in northeast Spain. If you've read Ernest Hemingway's classic novel The Sun Also Rises, then you may remember it's characters rambling through the Navarra region.

By Andrew Aguecheek

Spain is a beautiful land filled with history, art and culture. It's also filled with wonderful wine. The Penedes region in the Catalonian countryside west of Barcelona is second only to La Rioja in the worldwide popularity of its wines.

By Andrew Aguecheek

New South Wales, Australia, is a wine region like no other. While wine making is a growing industry, it's far from the sole focus of the area.

By Eleanor Duse

Spain is considered the best place in Europe to find good, quality wine at bargain prices. Of Spain's many wine regions, one drawing well-deserved attention is the tiny rural Priorat wine region.

By Richard Winter

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Though the summers of the Rias Baixas wine region can be warm and dry, this region is very rainy -- so much so that even its water-losing rocky soil is still too moist to grow grapes and requires special planting techniques.

By Sarah Siddons

The Ribera del Duero wine region is overwhelmingly devoted to a single grape that makes a single wine, the Tinto Fino, also known as the Tempranillo. This lone grape is responsible for approximately 95 percent of all wine production in the region.

By Sarah Siddons

Wine called Sherry may only come from the Jerez region of Spain, and more than 90 million liters of Sherry are produced each year. Why is it so popular?

By Eleanor Duse

Rural and rustic, without the urban bustle of Madrid and Seville or the sweeping architecture of Barcelona, Bierzo is home to several up and coming wineries.

By Eleanor Duse

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Italy is widely recognized as a top tier wine producer and Veneto, one of the nation's wine regions, is a great attribute. The region produces many DOC wines and plays an important role in the entire country's wine industry.

By Sarah Siddons

Australia is famous for Shiraz, but these grapes don't grow well in the state of Western Australia. Which wines flourish in the southwest of the land down under?

By Libby Little

The tremendous diversity of its geology and climate conditions make the Loire Valley the only part of France that reliably produces world-class wines of every type: red, white, sweet, dry, still and sparkling.

By Andrew Aguecheek

Lying on the fringes of the eastern border of France with Switzerland and Italy, the Savoie wine region is ideal for both skiing and wine.

By Richard Winter

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Most of Australia's wine comes from South Australian wine regions. The most famous, of course, is Shiraz, but the region produces a range of whites and reds.

By Sarah Siddons

Tasmanian wines are starting to get noticed and it might not be long before the island is known more for its Pinot Noir than it is for the Looney Tunes character Taz.

By Elizabeth Abbess

The Toro wine region in Spain is known for bold red wines. It's made a name for itself in recent years, but its winemaking history goes back centuries.

By Rosalind Jackson

If you've ever entertained fantasies of bicycling through the French countryside, you may want to plan a trip to Alsace -- with a good bottle of wine.

By Eleanor Duse

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Italy is one of the world's foremost names in wine production, in constant competition with powerhouse France for the title of world's top producer. Hand in hand with their large-scale production, Italy is a dominating force in exporting.

By Elizabeth Abbess

Although this diverse wine region is relatively unknown to most people, Apulia is one of the top 10 wine producing regions in the entire world.

By Sarah Siddons