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Food Facts & Fun

Food Facts is a listing of articles that teaches you how all types of foods, drinks and diets work.

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Turkish Coffee Is Steeped in Tradition — And Easy to Make

Since its introduction in 15th-century Yemen, Turkish coffee has served as a cultural touchstone in Middle Eastern, Eastern European and north African countries, its brewing infused with magic and myth.

The Right Glass Could Make Your Wine Taste Better

How much does the shape of your wineglass really affect the taste of your favorite pinot noir? Probably more than you realize.

What Makes a Whiskey Scotch Whisky?

Our scotch connoisseur says that what makes a whiskey 'scotch whisky' comes down to the legalities of where it's from and how it's made. Oh, and scotch whisky doesn't have an 'e' in its name.

How Will Food Pantries Meet the Demand of Coronavirus?

Food banks normally help feed people during times of need. But the coronavirus pandemic could send that need in the United States soaring to unprecedented levels.

Ancient Pisco Is Enjoying a Modern-day Renaissance

A smooth, South American brandy, Pisco is experiencing an American renaissance after centuries of popularity — and disputed history — in Peru and Chile.

Is Half-and-half Really Half and Half?

A lot of us use it every day, but what is actually in half-and-half and where did it come from?

The Nutty Story of Red Pistachios and the Iran Hostage Crisis 

There was a day, not so long ago, when you ate pistachios with the understanding that you'd come away with red fingers and a red mouth. What happened to the red pistachio?

How the Shamrock Shake Became McDonald's Mintiest Legend

The Shamrock Shake is back at McDonald's and now it's celebrating its 50th anniversary. We're breaking down all the quirks that make it so legendary.

Soju: The Wildly Popular Spirit of South Korea

Soju is South Korea's unofficial national drink, a rice-fermented concoction often likened to vodka, but with about half the alcohol content.

How Chopsticks Became the Staple Utensil of Asia

Chopsticks have been in use since 1200 B.C.E. And today more than 20 percent of the world's population uses chopsticks as its primary utensil.

That Frozen Treat From Dairy Queen? Not Really Ice Cream

You may be a huge fan of Dairy Queen's Blizzard treat, but this may be news to you: That frozen stuff isn't ice cream. In fact Dairy Queen doesn't sell ice cream at all.

Get Over It! Boxed Wine Is Better Than Bottled

Boxed wines have a stigma, and we're here to tell you there's just no need for it. They taste as good, last way longer and are more eco-friendly than bottled.

Who Put the Baby in the King Cake?

King cake is as much a staple of Mardi Gras as the parades and beads. But what's the story of this brightly colored cake? And why is there a plastic baby baked inside?

Gelatinous, Squishy Mochi Is Having a Moment

Mochi is a super-chewy traditional Japanese delicacy, made from mochigome, a short-grain glutinous rice.

The Pili Nut Is a Nutritional Powerhouse Worth Cracking

These nuts could be some of the healthiest we've ever come across. So why can't the pili nut crack the health food market?

Try Ghee, the 'Liquid Gold' Better Than Butter

If you've never cooked with ghee, then let us introduce you to this wonderfully rich cooking fat. It's made of butter, but it's way better.

Brace Yourself: Bananas Are Berries, Strawberries Aren't

If bananas are berries and strawberries and raspberries are not, what in the world is a berry anyway?

It Took a Court to Decide Whether Pringles Are Potato Chips

Pringles aren't like other potato chips. And back in 2007 Procter & Gamble sued to declare the snacks weren't even potato chips at all.

What's the Difference Between Baking Soda and Baking Powder?

Baking soda and baking powder are both leavening agents, but they work differently in batters and doughs. So, in a pinch, can you substitute one for the other?

Balut Is the Asian Street Food You Gotta Eat to Believe

At first glance, balut, which is a cooked, fertilized duck egg, might look unappetizing. But it's a favorite snack in Southeast Asia, and has been for centuries.

The Art and Science of Aging Beer

We know wine collectors age their wine. But what about beer? There's a movement of beer enthusiasts dabbling in aging beer, too. Do the same rules apply?

Truffles: The Rarest and Most Expensive Fungi in the World

Truffles are prized the world over for their pungent, earthy flavor, but what's so special about them, and why is the truffle trade so cutthroat and secretive?

What's All the Buzz About Manuka Honey? 

This native New Zealand 'liquid gold' honey may make you want to abandon the bear. But does it really have medicinal properties, and why is it so expensive?

If at First You Don't Succeed, Try Tripe Again

Humans have been cooking and eating tripe for centuries. Think you can stomach it?

What's the Difference Between Whiskey and Bourbon?

You might think the difference is only in the name, but it's more than that. The slight variations in recipes, aging and even geography make whiskey and bourbon two different alcohols.

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