Food Facts & Fun

Food Facts is a listing of articles that teaches you how all types of foods, drinks and diets work.

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These steaks are touted as some of the best you can buy. They're expensive — and huge. But are they worth the high price tag?

By Muriel Vega

This grassy herb adds a bright, floral kick to many Asian dishes, from curries and soups to stews and teas. It can even be used to repel insects.

By Muriel Vega

It's slimy, stringy and even quite pungent, but natto is also chock full of nutrients. So what is this superfood that's been a staple in Japan for thousands of years?

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Halloumi cheese, delicious all by itself, is a great alternative to meat because, fried or grilled, the flavor can't be beat.

By Patty Rasmussen

Pomelos are the largest — and one of the oldest — fruits of the citrus family. They're native to southeastern Asia and are chock full of nutritional benefits.

By Jeremy Glass

Also known as winter radish, icicle radish, Chinese radish and Japanese radish, daikon has the crunchy texture of a red radish, but with a much milder taste.

By Tara Yarlagadda

You can up your culinary prowess by using either of these fats in your cooking. But is one better than the other?

By Muriel Vega

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This warm, fluffy, donut-like treat, stuffed with cream or fruit-based filling and savory flowers, is a pre-Lent staple in Poland and a Fat Tuesday tradition in the U.S.

By Tara Yarlagadda

This pretty pink fruit is part of the flower of a climbing cactus. The plant likely originated in Central America but you can find the fruit almost anywhere today.

By Patty Rasmussen

Taro is a starchy root tuber that looks a lot like a potato, but it's rich in polyphenols, giving it a bigger bang as a healthy alternative.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Food writer Calvin Trillin once estimated that 80 percent of boudin bought in Louisiana doesn't make it home — it's eaten right in the parking lot. Why are people so passionate about this sausage?

By Caroline Eubanks

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These two Italian cheeses may look similar on the outside. But it's what's revealed on the inside that makes them so deliciously different.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Its name is a derivative of a Mayan word for "hair" and by the looks of it you can see why. But how do you eat a rambutan and what does it taste like?

By Patty Rasmussen

Caster sugar is a term you may have come across in a British baking book or website. But what does it mean really? And what sugar can you substitute for it?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

These colorful, chalk-like wafers hit the market in 1847. But they certainly aren't the most flavorful of treats. So why are they the classic candy we love to hate?

By John Donovan

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Aaaah ... peanut butter. For some, it's a staple food. But how much butter is there in a tablespoon of the stuff?

By Jeremy Glass

Many recipes call for kosher salt rather than regular table salt. But does it really matter? And can you substitute table salt if that's all you have on hand?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

During the winter, many Americans love a nice hot bowl of oatmeal. But people around the world eat porridge at different times of the day and in different ways. Here's how to make a perfect pot of porridge.

By Alia Hoyt

You may see a recipe for Key lime pie and wonder how important it is to use Key limes rather than regular Persian limes. What's the difference between them anyway?

By Caroline Eubanks

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Graham crackers were invented by Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham as part of a radical 19th century diet. His goal? To curb joy and desire.

By Patty Rasmussen

This syrupy sweet wine is synonymous with Passover and other Jewish holidays. So why is it popular with so many people outside the Jewish community as well?

By Jeremy Glass

Yeah, anybody can hack up a watermelon, but what's the best way to cut one into presentable, uniform slices without cutting off your fingers at the same time?

By Jeremy Glass

Latkes are potato pancakes that are commonly eaten during Hanukkah. What's behind this delicious Jewish tradition?

By Stephanie Vermillion

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It's not cream. And it's not creamy. But it is handy and inexpensive, and it'll give your food 'oomph.'

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

You might think prosecco and Champagne are the same because they both have bubbles, but you'd be wrong. So what's makes a quality prosecco?

By Stephanie Vermillion