Fruits and Vegetable Facts

Fruits & Vegetables are the most often overlooked portion of our daily food intake. Learn how fruits and vegetables work and how to eat more of them everyday.

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The fruit of the jabuticaba grows on its trunk and branches and is as sweet as a grape. But it's very perishable once it's picked.

By Laurie L. Dove

Hostas are a perennial garden favorite, but are still relatively unknown as a delicious and easily prepared culinary delicacy.

By Laurie L. Dove

You've undoubtedly heard about heirloom tomatoes, but what's so different about them, and why do they taste so good?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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Does your mouth get all excited at the thought of eating a juicy grapefruit? Well, pucker up, because grapefruit is loaded with the vitamins and antioxidants your body needs.

By Laurie L. Dove

You probably won't find a pawpaw in your grocery store or local farmers' market, so what's the deal with this most elusive of fruits?

By Laurie L. Dove

Eating a pomegranate may seem intimidating at first, but once you learn how to do it, it's easy — and those shiny, jewel-toned seeds are well-worth the trouble.

By Laurie L. Dove

Science has made it possible for some apples to be stored as long as a year before selling. How is that done, and is it safe?

By Joanna Thompson

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Pomelos are the largest — and one of the oldest — fruits of the citrus family. They're native to southeastern Asia and are chock full of nutritional benefits.

By Jeremy Glass

Also known as winter radish, icicle radish, Chinese radish and Japanese radish, daikon has the crunchy texture of a red radish, but with a much milder taste.

By Tara Yarlagadda

This pretty pink fruit is part of the flower of a climbing cactus. The plant likely originated in Central America but you can find the fruit almost anywhere today.

By Patty Rasmussen

Taro is a starchy root tuber that looks a lot like a potato, but it's rich in polyphenols, giving it a bigger bang as a healthy alternative.

By Tara Yarlagadda

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Its name is a derivative of a Mayan word for "hair" and by the looks of it you can see why. But how do you eat a rambutan and what does it taste like?

By Patty Rasmussen

You may see a recipe for Key lime pie and wonder how important it is to use Key limes rather than regular Persian limes. What's the difference between them anyway?

By Caroline Eubanks

Yeah, anybody can hack up a watermelon, but what's the best way to cut one into presentable, uniform slices without cutting off your fingers at the same time?

By Jeremy Glass

You might have seen lychees at an international farmers market and not known they were lychees. The dark red tropical fruit looks a little like raspberries and are packed with potassium — and sugar.

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Shallots belong to the same family as onions, leeks, scallions and garlic. They look like small, elongated onions but have a sweeter, milder flavor.

By Tara Yarlagadda

Capers are actually the flower buds of the caper bush. So where does all that flavor come from?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Heart of palm, with a similar taste and texture to artichoke heart, is a staple in Central and South America and a healthy addition to almost any menu.

By Tara Yarlagadda

The Chicken of the Woods mushroom is jam-packed with protein and easy to spot with its bright orange color and ruffled edges.

By Katie Carman

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This starchy, staple fruit that grows in the tropics has the potential to provide food security to millions. So what exactly is it and who's eating it?

By Stephanie Vermillion

Sure, eating prunes can help you have regular bowel movements, but these sweet dried plums can also help you build — and maintain — strong bones.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

Ube is a sweet species of yam that stands out because of its vivid purple color and sweet, creamy taste.

By Jeremy Glass

The U.S. banned the gooseberry back in the early 1900s because it was a host for white pine blister rust disease. But now few states prohibit the tart berry, so eat up!

By Stephanie Vermillion

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Yes – it could happen to you, good person. KABOOM! It's fairly rare, but a potentially catastrophic rind failure lurks under the green-striped shell of every seemingly innocent watermelon in the produce aisle.

By Carrie Tatro

Sometimes referred as the 'queen of fruit,' the mangosteen has a soft white interior, a mild taste and is notoriously difficult to find in the U.S. Here's why.

By Alia Hoyt