Fruits and Vegetable Facts

Fruits & Vegetables are the most often overlooked portion of our daily food intake. Learn how fruits and vegetables work and how to eat more of them everyday.


Little tiny vegetables seem to pop up everywhere these days, but where do they come from?

Don't let 'seedless' watermelons fool you — even though they may not prompt constant spitting, they really do have seeds.

If peanuts are technically not nuts, what are they?

Kale has become the little black dress of the culinary world: chic, understated and perfect for nearly every occasion. But it comes with a not-so-elegant side effect. We'll — ahem — get to the bottom of why kale makes you so gassy.

Discerning between a fruit and a vegetable may seem simple: Fruits have seeds and vegetables don't. This works great if you're a botanist, but not so well if you're not. We'll finally tell you which category tomatoes fall into (or maybe we won't).

If you can't get enough of starchy foods, you don't need to limit yourself to potatoes and squash. Fruits have starch, too! We'll tell you why, and also reveal the starchiest fruit of them all.

If bananas are your favorite fruit, you may soon pick up a bunch that just seems ... different somehow. The culprit: a fungus that's killing the Cavendish.

Kale packs a nutritional wallop -- 1,300 percent of your daily vitamin K, for starters -- and is incredibly versatile and easy to cook. Here are 10 ways to cook kale.

Sweet potatoes have been around a long, long time, but it seems like they're just now getting the fanfare they deserve. If you'd like to add this good-for-you vegetable to your diet, here are five ways to liven it up.

It's hard to imagine the American diet without tomatoes. But there are so many different varieties, and it can be hard to tell what kind to use for certain dishes.

Next time you're at your local grocer, cruise down the canned vegetable aisle and take a look at how many ways they've come up with to can a tomato. Diced, stewed, whole, sauced. But can one substitute for the other? After all, they're all tomatoes, right?

Does it really matter if your carrots are boiled, steamed or roasted? Actually, it does. But that's the only simple part of the equation. Why would cooking vegetables make them less healthy?

The great tomato storage debate seems to be settled by the label on that little package of Romas warning: "Never Refrigerate." Pretty straightforward. Still, many people do just that and claim no ill effects. So, is the warning valid?

Tomato seeds are teeny-tiny, but they hold a lot of potential. If you extract them and dry them properly, you can create your very own heirloom tomatoes.

Tomato puree can serve as a base or add flavor to lots of dishes. What's more, it's quick and easy to prepare. Here's how to add it to your cooking repertoire.

Pelting unlucky victims with rotten produce is one of our oldest forms of expression. So, where did it start and why?

Tomatoes in season are some of the most delicious foods on Earth. There are still lots of ways to enjoy their flavor in the off season. You can even try them in place of some common ingredients. Here are five great examples.

Not all pickles are cucumbers. You can turn your unripe garden tomatoes into sweet or sour pickled delights. But how?

Just because it's healthy doesn't mean it's low-cal. Look at the mighty yet fatty avocado -- and the sugary caloric pineapple. Tomatoes are a salad staple, but just how many calories do these juicy veggies pack?

You don't think twice before piling tomato slices on your sub sandwich or dragging a french fry through a puddle of ketchup, but there was a time when people actually feared tomatoes. Here's the juicy history of the tomato.

What's for dinner? The answer is so much simpler when you can open the freezer door and pull out an entree, stew or sauce you prepared a few weekends ago. Tomatoes freeze well and can help you put dinner on the table in a snap.

It doesn't take much talent to cut a tomato well, but it does take some care. Here, five tips to help you turn a beautiful tomato into a slice, a chunk or a perfect, tiny square you can be proud of.

The use of a fresh tomato is seemingly endless. You can make pasta sauce, salsa or even eat it raw and whole. So, it only makes sense that you grow your own in your garden. Have too many coming off the vines? We'll tell you what to do with them.

Tomatoes are easy to grow in your backyard garden -- maybe a little too easy. When the season's over, and you're stuck with more tomatoes than you know what to do with, it's a shame to throw them out. Now, you don't have to.

Tomatoes are a staple vegetable found in countless recipes. If you want the freshest tomatoes for your fare, you can grow your own and can the leftovers before they go bad. We'll give you five tips to help you can your bounty.